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Milestones in the History of Cancer Control in Congress and at NCI

1937
  • Congress enacts legislation to establish the National Cancer Institute.
1971
  • Congress reaffirms its support by enacting The National Cancer Act and including specific language regarding cancer control.
1973
  • NCI creates the Division of Cancer Control and Rehabilitation, the first structural unit within the Institute devoted to cancer control.
1983
  • NCI forms the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control to accelerate the science of cancer control, giving a new definition to the term and a framework that describes a linear series of phases from hypothesis generation to demonstration projects.
1996
  • The NCI Director and Board of Scientific Advisors convene the Cancer Control Program Review Group to assess NCI’s cancer control research program and make recommendations for the pursuit of research opportunities with the greatest potential to reduce the nation’s cancer burden.
1997
  • NCI undergoes a major programmatic reorganization and establishes the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences.
1998-Present
  • Congress expresses interest and requests information on DCCPS scientific priorities, including cancer registries, environment and breast cancer, cancer in minorities, tobacco control and harm reduction, health communications, cancer screening technologies, 5 A Day and other nutrition programs, weight, physical activity, and cancer survivorship.
2006
  • Congress passes the National Institutes of Health Reform Act of 2006, reauthorizing the NIH and instituting certain reforms to NIH’s organization and structure. One such reform is the promotion of research that takes place across multiple institutes, as is the case with many research initiatives within DCCPS.
2009
  • Congress passes the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also known as the Stimulus, which supports DCCPS work related to cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and genomics.
2009
  • Congress passes the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, giving the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the authority to regulate tobacco. The FDA is utilizing DCCPS research related to tobacco marketing, tobacco cessation, secondhand smoke, and other topics in implementing its regulatory authority.
2010
  • Congress passes the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with multiple implications for the research agenda of DCCPS. The ACA supports cost of care research and comparative effectiveness research of the types that DCCPS has been initiating for many years. The ACA improves insurance coverage for many preventative care and screening services that are studied by DCCPS, as well as tobacco cessation treatments. The ACA also requires the NIH to conduct research concerning screening and prevention of breast cancer in young women.
2013
  • Congress passes the Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act as part of the National Defense Authorization Act, instructing the NCI to develop scientific frameworks that will provide direction for research concerning the most deadly cancers such as pancreatic cancer.