National Cancer Institute
Behavioral Research - Cancer Control and Population Sciences

Key Initiatives

Epidemiology Studies Regarding HPV and Cervical Cancer

HPV in Heterosexual Couples

Investigator: Jeffrey E. Korte

Investigators propose to add a sub-study to the Dual STI Prevention Interventions for Minority Couples trial of a cognitive-behavioral intervention to reduce sexually transmitted infections (STI). Five hundred heterosexual couples are participating in the trial. All participating women had a non-viral STI at the beginning of the trial. The couples participating in the trial are being followed for 1 year, with specimens collected and detailed interviews conducted.

The proposed sub-study will collect genital swabs and blood samples from men and women in the Dual STI Prevention Interventions for Minority Couples trial. The specific aims include to: (1) continue enrollment of high-risk minority heterosexual participants into the HPV sub-study; (2) collect and store genital swab samples from men and women for assessment of HPV DNA and viral load; (3) collect and store blood samples from men and women for assessment of HPV, CT, HSV-1, and HSV-2 serology; (4) collect questionnaire data from men and women relating to HPV knowledge, HPV vaccine acceptability and use, and other HPV-related topics; and (5) collect data on cervical inflammation. The main contribution of this sub-study will be to create a bank of specimens that can be used to study heterosexual transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the factors affecting the chance of transmission. The behavioral and biological data collected in the Dual STI Prevention Interventions for Minority Couples trial also will allow investigators to assess the role of male circumcision, condom use, concurrent STIs in either partner, and HPV level in the infecting partner.

For more information contact NCI Program Director: Vaurice Starks

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Last Updated: January 5, 2012

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