National Cancer Institute
Behavioral Research - Cancer Control and Population Sciences

TReND: Smoking Cessation across Race/Ethnic and Income Groups of Small Sample Sizes


Visit TReND’s web portal www.tobaccodisparities.org exit disclaimerto learn more about research, programs, policies, and resources relevant to tobacco and health disparities.

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About the Project

Rationale: An understanding of the quitting process and related factors among small sample size population groups may provide insight into designing targeted smoking cessation interventions for members of specific racial/ethnic and income groups.

Purpose: Through secondary data analyses of the 2003 Tobacco Use Special Cessation Supplement to the Current Population Survey (TUSCS-CPS), TReND’s investigators will evaluate previously identified predictors of cessation and their relation to successful quitting. This project will focus on populations that traditionally have been understudied due to small sample sizes; a limitation that will be overcome by the large 2003 TUSCS-CPS. The recent public availability of the 2003 TUSCS-CPS dataset is timely as it is the first TUSCS-CPS to include extensive questionnaire items on smoking cessation which will allow us to describe patterns of smoking behaviors (e.g., consumption), use of cessation aids (e.g., calling a helpline, using NRT), and factors associated with use or non-use (e.g., physician advice) for small sample size populations, such as various race/ethnic groups by income strata. The association between these factors and quit attempts/successful cessation across groups will also be examined.

Impact: Results from this study may have a long-term impact on the smoking cessation field by stimulating additional research and research translation to specific small sample size groups, as well as informing policies and strategies that ultimately impact disparities in tobacco use.

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Research Team

Dennis R. Trinidad, PhD, MPH (Principal Investigator)
Claremont Graduate University

Sherry L. Emery, PhD, MBA
University of Illinois at Chicago

Rachel Grana, BS
University of Southern California

Karen Messer, PhD
University of California, San Diego

Eliseo Perez-Stable, MD
University of California, San Francisco

John P. Pierce, PhD
University of California, San Diego

Martha M. White, MS
University of California, San Diego

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Contact Us

Principal Investigator
Dennis R. Trinidad, PhD, MPHexit disclaimer
Associate Professor
Associate Dean for Administration
School of Community and Global Health
Claremont Graduate University
Email: dennis.trinidad@cgu.edu

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Project Activities and Findings

Manuscripts

Trinidad DR, Pérez-Stable EJ, Emery SL, White MM, Grana RA, Messer K (2009). Intermittent and light smoking across race/ethnic groups in the United States. Nicotine and Tobacco Research;11(2):203-10.

Trinidad DR, Pérez-Stable EJ, Emery SL, White MM, Messer K (in press). A nationwide analysis of disparities in smoking behaviors, cessation and related factors across racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. American Journal of Public Health.

Trinidad DR, Pérez-Stable EJ, White MM, Messer K., Pierce JP (2010). Menthol cigarettes and the smoking cessation among racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. Addiction; 105 Suppl 1:84-94.

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Presentations

Trinidad DR, Emery SL, White MM, Pérez-Stable EJ, Messer KS (February 2008). Smoking by income and education: Differences between Hispanics/Latinos and Non-Hispanic Whites. Poster presentation at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, Portland, OR.

Trinidad DR, Pérez-Stable EJ, Messer KS, White MM, Pierce JP (April 2010). A false sense of confidence: Menthol cigarettes and smoking cessation across racial/ethnic groups in the U.S. Poster presentation at the 31st Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, WA.

Trinidad DR, Pérez-Stable EJ, White MM, Emery SL, Messer KS (February 2008). Smoking cessation behaviors across race/ethnic groups in the U.S. Oral presentation as part of organized symposium presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco, Portland, OR.

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Other Resources and Publications

Select Scientific Publications and Articles

DiClemente CC, Prochaska JO, Fairhurst SK, Velicer WF, Velasquez MM, Rossi JS (1991). The process of smoking cessation: an analysis of precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages of change. J Consult Clin Psychol; 59(2):295-304.

Gilpin EA, Pierce JP, Farkas AJ (1997). Duration of smoking abstinence and success in quitting. J Natl Cancer Inst; 89:572-576.

Levinson AH, Perez-Stable EJ, Espinoza P, Flores ET, Byers TE (2004). Latinos report less use of pharmaceutical aids when trying to quit smoking. Am J Prev Med. 26(2):105-111.

Pierce JP, Farkas AJ, Gilpin EA (1998). Beyond stages of change: the quitting continuum measures progress towards successful smoking cessation. Addiction; 93(2):277-286.

US Department of Health and Human Services (1989a). Reducing the Health Consequences of Smoking: 25 years of progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; DHHS Publication No. (CDC) 89-8411.

US Department of Health and Human Services (1990). The Health Benefits of Smoking Cessation. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 1990. DHHS Publication No. (CDC) 90-8416.

US Department of Health and Human Services (1988). The Health Consequences of Smoking Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. DHHS Publication No. (CDC) 88-8406.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1998). Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups—African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Atlanta, Georgia.

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The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and American Legacy Foundation are proud to fund the Tobacco Research Network on Disparities (TReND). Previous support has also been provided by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office on Women’s Health, NCI Office of Women’s Health, and the NCI Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

National Cancer Institute    Legacy - American Legacy Foundation
Last Updated: August 15, 2012

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