National Cancer Institute
Behavioral Research - Cancer Control and Population Sciences

TReND: Special Journal Issue: Tobacco Control among Diverse Populations


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About the Project

Rationale: Since the publication of the 1998 Surgeon’s General report, Tobacco Use Among U.S. Minority Racial/Ethnic Groups[1], we have made substantial progress in building our evidence-base on how to reduce tobacco use and exposure in the United States. However, little is known about how to reduce tobacco use, exposure, and the disproportionate burden of tobacco-related diseases among minority racial/ethnic and low socioeconomic status groups in the United States and among populations experiencing disparities in other countries. The 2008 Clinical Practice Guidelines, Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence[2] states that additional research is needed on the 1) effectiveness and compliance of treatment medications, 2) the effectiveness of dependence interventions and utilization of novel treatment delivery and settings, and 3) the effectiveness of quitlines among low socioeconomic status groups and minority racial/ethnic groups. Furthermore, little is know on how to prevent and reduce the disproportionate burden of secondhand smoke exposure among the poor and among African Americans who have the highest rates of secondhand smoke exposure in the United States [3]. A deeper understanding of the efficacy of evidence-based prevention and treatment and related issues is essential to reducing and eliminating tobacco-related health disparities.

Purpose: This special issue responds to a critical need to address smoking prevention and cessation interventions minority racial/ethnic and low socioeconomic status populations. This special issue includes empirical and conceptual/theoretical papers, as well as manuscripts related to measurement and evaluation, and retention and recruitment of populations in smoking prevention and cessation interventions. This special issue will be published in the American Journal of Health Promotion in 2011.

Impact: The papers included in this special journal issue will inform policy and practice related to smoking cessation prevention and intervention programs and will also stimulate additional research that examines the efficacy of evidence-based practice among minority racial/ethnic and low socioeconomic status populations.

References

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1998). Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups—African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Atlanta, GA.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2008). Clinical Practice Guidelines, 2008 Update: Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008). Disparities in secondhand smoke exposure – United States, 1988-1994 and 1999-2004. MMWR; 57(27); 744-747.

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Editorial Team

Ken Resnicow, PhD (Editor)
University of Michigan

Anita F. Fernander, PhD (Associate Editor)
University of Kentucky

K. Vish Viswanath, PhD (Associate Editor)
Harvard School of Public Health
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Eliseo Perez-Stable, MD (Associate Editor)
University of California, San Francisco

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Contact Us

Lead Editor
Ken Resnicow, PhDexit disclaimer
Professor, Health Behavior & Health Education
University of Michigan
School of Public Health
kresnic@umich.edu

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Project Activities and Findings

Special Journal Issue

(Not yet available.)

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Other Resources and Publications

Other TReND Projects
Conceptual and Methodological Issues for Research on Tobacco-Related Health Disparities

Select Scientific Publications and Articles
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (1998). Tobacco Use Among U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Groups—African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics: A Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, Atlanta, GA.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2008). Clinical Practice Guidelines, 2008 Update: Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008). Disparities in secondhand smoke exposure – United States, 1988-1994 and 1999-2004. MMWR; 57(27); 744-747.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008). Cigarette smoking among adults – United States, 2007. MMWR, 57(45), 1221-1226.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008). Smoking prevalence among women of reproductive age – United States, 2006. MMWR, 57(31), 849-852.

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The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and American Legacy Foundation are proud to fund the Tobacco Research Network on Disparities (TReND). Previous support has also been provided by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Office on Women’s Health, NCI Office of Women’s Health, and the NCI Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities.

National Cancer Institute    Legacy - American Legacy Foundation
Last Updated: August 8, 2012

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