Skip Navigation
National Cancer Institute

About Basic Biobehavioral and Psychological Sciences Branch (BBPSB)

Mission

BBPSB cultivates an extramural portfolio that generates basic behavioral, biobehavioral, and psychological science knowledge with translational relevance to cancer prevention and control.

Scientific Priorities

The branch supports the systematic analysis and investigation of the molecular, cellular, neural, psychological, and social processes underlying health-related behaviors and decisions identified as attributable risks for cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Research that employs observational or causal experimental designs in controlled or natural conditions with human or animal subjects is supported. Studies that combine diverse levels of analysis and examine reciprocal interactions among levels are encouraged.

Research domains cultivated by BBPSB:

  • Cognition, emotion, judgment, and decision making related to cancer prevention and control
  • Sensation, attention, and perception related to cancer prevention and control
  • Biological pathways through which psychosocial stressors influence cancer biology and outcomes
  • Methodology and measurement of biobehavioral moderators and mediators of cancer prevention and control
  • Identification and validation of psychological and biobehavioral mechanisms or processes hypothesized to be measurable, malleable, and implicated in behavior change relevant to cancer prevention and control
  • Short- and long-term effects of cancer and cancer treatment
  • Ethical issues in behavioral research related to cancer prevention and control
  • Psychological and behavioral aspects of cancer treatment adherence

Cancer Control Falls Squarely Within the Province of the Psychological Sciences, American Psychologist, 2015

Funding for Basic Psychological Science at the National Cancer Institute exit disclaimer, APS Observer Mary/June 2012

The National Cancer Institute: A Hub for Psychological and Behavioral Sciences exit disclaimer, APS Observer May/June 2009