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National Cancer Institute

NCI Tobacco Control Monograph: A Socioecological Approach to Addressing Tobacco-Related Health Disparities

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is pleased to announce the release of a new tobacco control monograph, "A Socioecological Approach to Addressing Tobacco-Related Health Disparities."

A Socioecological Approach to Addressing Tobacco-Related Health Disparities

Although enormous progress has been made in reducing tobacco use and tobacco-related disease and death in the U.S., this progress has not been equally distributed across population groups. The research summarized in this monograph reinforces the need for continued efforts to accelerate declines in tobacco use and secondhand smoke exposure across all population groups.

As this monograph explains, tobacco use contributes substantially to disparities in the burden of cancer by race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and other demographic factors. A central challenge for the nation's cancer control efforts is to ensure that all Americans benefit from advances in tobacco control research and practice.

Download the Monograph and Executive Summary:
cancercontrol.cancer.gov/monograph22

Share the Monograph With Your Stakeholders and Partners: Visit our website for sharing tools, including a social media tool kit, infographic, flyer, slide deck, and related resources. Help inform tobacco control and health disparities researchers, advocates, and policymakers about the monograph's key findings.
cancercontrol.cancer.gov/monograph22

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Read the latest @theNCI Monograph on tobacco-related #healthdisparities: https://go.usa.gov/xR675

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#Tobaccodisparities include higher rates of tobacco use and tobacco-related cancer deaths among some groups. https://go.usa.gov/xR675

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Tobacco control policies could prevent ~45% of smoking-attributable deaths among the poorest Americans by 2064. https://go.usa.gov/xR675

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  • Progress in reducing tobacco use in the U.S. has been uneven. Substantially higher rates of tobacco use persist among population groups defined by race/ethnicity, occupation, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and other factors. https://go.usa.gov/xR675
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