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National Cancer Institute

Training & Education

In collaboration with other academic institutions, professional organizations, and funding agencies, the Implementation Science (IS) team coordinates and supports several training and educational activities, including a monthly webinar series, training programs, and an annual conference. Collectively, these activities aim to increase the field’s capacity to conduct rigorous implementation research.

Advanced Topics in Implementation Science Webinar Series

The Advanced Topics in Implementation Science Webinar Series is a free, monthly webinar series focused on advanced topics in dissemination and implementation research. Each webinar includes approximately 40 minutes of presentations by experts in the field and approximately 20 minutes of discussion and Q&A. The Advanced Topics in Implementation Science Webinar Series was started in 2013 and, on average, offers 10 sessions annually. To date, over 27 webinars have been conducted, most of which are archived and can be accessed for free.

Training Programs

Implementation Science Team Conference Trainings and Workshops

Members of the Implementation Science Team conduct a variety of trainings and workshops at cancer-related meetings, conferences, and venues. These trainings are often in partnership with other organizations, agencies and institutions and are focused on enhancing the capacity of researchers to conduct cutting-edge dissemination and implementation research in cancer control and population sciences both in the U.S. and abroad.

Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH)

The Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH) was developed by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to help build capacity in dissemination and implementation research. TIDIRH was held annually from 2011 through 2015 and hosted at various sites, as listed below. Additional information about each TIDIRH training can be found at each conference website, including the agenda and copies of presentations from TIDIRH experts. As of 2016, TIDIRH meets in conjunction with the Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in the Washington D.C. area. It is currently being offered as a dual online and in-person training.

Mentored Training in Dissemination and Implementation Research in Cancer (MT-DIRC)

The Mentored Training in Dissemination and Implementation Research in Cancer exit disclaimer (MT-DIRC) is a training program designed to build capacity in dissemination and implementation (D&I) research in cancer prevention and control. The program applies state-of-the-art training methods to build capacity among post-doctoral scholars (PhDs, MDs or other doctoral-level degrees) who want to pursue D&I research in cancer. 

  • MT-DIRC is funded by a grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI; R25 CA171994-01A1). Ross C. Brownson, PhD, Professor, Washington University in St. Louis, in the Principal Investigator of MT-DIRC. Project partners include the Veterans Administration (VA) and the Cancer Research Network (CRN); the training program is funded from 2013 to 2018. 
  • Application information is available here: http://mtdirc.org/about/apply-now/. exit disclaimer

Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation

The Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation is a forum for discussing the science of dissemination and implementation and aims to grow the research base by bridging the gap between evidence, practice, and policy in health and medicine. Researchers, evaluators and implementers who are interested in identifying opportunities, challenges, and strategies for disseminating the findings and implementation of research to key stakeholders are encouraged to attend. Discuss, debate, and explore in-depth approaches to advance dissemination and implementation science. The annual conference has been held since 2007; year, conference theme, and a link to the conference homepage are below (where applicable). In 2013, three expert meetings were held in lieu of the annual conference. Each meeting focused on a particular theme in implementation science. A brief summary and list of products from each meeting are below. Note that many of the websites have free copies of conference presentations available for download.

    • 2016: Mapping the Complexity and Dynamism of the Field exit disclaimer
    • 2015: Optimizing Personal and Population Health
    • 2014: Transforming Health Systems to Optimize Individual and Population Health
    • 2013: Expert Meetings:
      1. Co-Chairs: Drs. David Chambers and Enola Proctor
      2. Summary: The purpose of this meeting was to review current dissemination and implementation (D&I) research training programs and brainstorm future directions for the field. While multiple programs have flourished, including the Training Institute for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH), Implementation Research Institute (IRI), Mentored Training in Dissemination and Implementation Research in Cancer (MT-DIRC), and the KT Canada Summer Training Institute, as well as programs within universities, limited discussion has been held to articulate a cohesive approach to meet the needs of D&I research trainees. This meeting brought together faculty, trainees and other key stakeholders to identify characteristics of existing programs, gaps in training, and next steps to strengthen the capacity of the field. A summary of the meeting was presented as part of the NCI Advanced Topics in Implementation Science Webinar Series, on January 28th, 2014 (archived on this website). exit disclaimer
      3. Products
        1. Mapping Training Needs for Dissemination and Implementation Research: Lessons from a Synthesis of Existing D&I Research Training Programs (2016). Chambers, DA, Proctor, EK, Brownson, RC, & Straus, SE. Translational Behavioral Medicine.
        2. Another manuscript is under review.   
      1. Co-Chairs: Drs. Gila Neta, Chris Carpenter, and Ross Brownson
      2. Summary: The goals of this working group were to identify key areas in need of better measurement and reporting at all stages (planning, delivery, evaluation, outcomes) of dissemination and implementation (D&I) research. The working group included 23 D&I researchers, practitioners, funders, and decision-makers from the United States and Canada. The group developed a framework articulating the key areas of measurement and reporting in D&I research, and highlighting critical areas in need of improvement. The group also concluded that the field would greatly benefit from measurement resources to enhance the ease, harmonization, and rigor of D&I evaluation efforts, and some members of the group conducted and published an environmental scan and literature review of resources for D&I measures. A member of the group developed an interactive website designed to help researchers and practitioners select the D&I Model that best fits their research question or practice problem, adapt the model to the study or practice context, fully integrate the model into the research or practice process, and find existing measurement instruments for the model constructs.
      3. Products:
        1. A Framework for Enhancing the Value of Research for Dissemination and Implementation (2015). Neta G, Glasgow RE, Carpenter CR, Grimshaw JM, Rabin BA, Fernandez ME, Brownson RC. American Journal of Public Health. [link to PubMed abstract]
        2. Measurement Resources for Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (2016). Rabin BA, Lewis CC, Norton WE, Neta G, Chambers D, Tobin JN, Brownson R, Glasgow RE. Implementation Science. [link to PubMed abstract]
        3. Dissemination and Implementation Models in Health Research and Practice. Website: dissemination-implementation.org.
      1. Co-Chairs: Drs. Lori Ducharme and C. Hendricks Brown
      2. Summary: The purpose of this meeting was to review the current state and potential future direction of D&I research in the specific area of study designs. While the randomized controlled trial is the standard design employed across NIH, it is not always the most appropriate or most feasible study design for implementation trials. This meeting sought to inventory the range of design options that are appropriate – and under what conditions – to support implementation research that is rigorous, relevant, and will move the field forward. Participants included 10 expert researchers from a variety of disciplines, in both academic and applied health care settings. A summary of the meeting was presented as part of the NCI Advanced Topics in Implementation Science Webinar Series on March 24, 2014 (link to archived webinar).
      3. Products:
        1. An Overview of Research and Evaluation Designs for Dissemination and Implementation (in press). Brown, HC, Curran, G, Palinkas, L, Aarons, GA, Wells, KB, Jones, L, Collins, LM, Duan, N, Mittman, BS, Wallace, A., Tabak, RG, Ducharme, L, Chambers, DA, Neta, G, Wiley, T, Landsverk, J., Cheung, K., and Cruden, G. Annual Review of Public Health.
        2. Another manuscript is in development.
    • 2012: Research at the Crossroads
    • 2011: Policy and Practice
    • 2010: Methods and Measurement
    • 2009: Building Research Capacity to Bridge the Gap from Science to Service
    • 2008: No conference
    • 2007: Building the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in the Service of Public Health