Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) Use

Background

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) represent a rapidly changing class of tobacco products known by many different names, including e-cigarettes, e-cigs, vapes, mods, and tank systems. ENDS deliver an aerosol to the user that typically contains nicotine, propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin and flavoring chemicals. The first ENDS products entered the U.S. marketplace around 2007. In 2018, 3.2% of U.S. adults (age 18 and older) reported current (“every day” or “someday”) use of ENDS. Since 2014, ENDS have been the most used tobacco product among U.S. youth. In 2020, about 3.6 million U.S. youth, including about 1 in 5 high school students and 1 in 20 middle school students, reported current (past 30 day) use of ENDS.

Despite rapidly accumulating research, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the health harms and potential benefits of ENDS products due in part due to their relatively recent entry to the U.S. market, the rapidly evolving nature of the ENDS marketplace, and changes in the policy landscape at the federal, state and local level. For example, although many adult smokers report using ENDS to help them quit smoking or to reduce their cigarette consumption, the Surgeon General stated in the most recent report on smoking cessation (2020) that there is presently inadequate evidence to conclude that e-cigarettes, in general, increase smoking cessation. Youth ENDS use raises concerns about nicotine addiction, negative effects of nicotine on adolescent brain development, and other potential health harms, including increased risk of initiating cigarette smoking.

NCI supports research to understand the potential impact of ENDS use on both individual and population health, as it relates to cancer control and prevention. NCI’s portfolio includes grants that examine health effects of ENDS use, perceptions and communication of ENDS’ harms, youth and young adult ENDS use behaviors, ENDS marketing and promotion, and the influence of ENDS use on other tobacco product use behaviors, especially cigarette smoking. Many grants on this topic are funded through the Tobacco Regulatory Science Program, an NIH partnership with FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products to fund research to inform FDA’s tobacco regulatory activities.

Funding Opportunity Announcements Related to Ends

The following is a list of ENDS-related funding announcements. A complete list of current Behavioral Research Program funding announcements can be found here.

Note: Speaking with the Program/Scientific Contact listed on the announcement to determine eligibility is highly recommended.

Title Announcement # Expiration Date Contact
Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS): Population, Clinical and Applied Prevention Research PAR-18-847 (R01 Clinical Trial Optional)
PAR-18-848 (R21 Clinical Trial Optional)
June 16, 2021 For cancer-related FOA questions:
Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov

For general FOA questions:
Mary L. Garcia-Cazarin, M.S., Ph.D.
Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)
mary.garcia-cazarin@nih.gov
Tobacco Regulatory Science

View Active BRP Grants
RFA-OD-19-028 (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) February 14, 2021 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov
Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS): Basic Mechanisms of Health Effects PAR-18-845 (R01 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
PAR-18-846 (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
June 16, 2021 For cancer-related FOA questions:
Ron Johnson, Ph.D.
rjohnso2@mail.nih.gov

For general FOA questions:
Mary L. Garcia-Cazarin, M.S., Ph.D.
Office of Disease Prevention (ODP)
mary.garcia-cazarin@nih.gov
Notice of Special Interest: Research to Advance the Understanding of Tobacco Product Pharmacokinetic Research NOT-OD-20-081 February 13, 2021 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov
Maximizing the Scientific Value of Existing Biospecimen Collections RFA-OD-19-021 (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) March 9, 2021 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov
Secondary Analyses of Existing Datasets of Tobacco Use and Health RFA-OD-19-022 (R21 Clinical Trial Not Allowed) March 9, 2021 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov
Mentored Research Scientist Career Development Award in Tobacco Regulatory Research RFA-OD-20-008 (K01 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
RFA-OD-20-011 (K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Required)
July 11, 2022 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov
Pathway to Independence Award in Tobacco Regulatory Research RFA-OD-20-009 (K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
RFA-OD-20-010 (K99/R00 Independent Clinical Trial Required)
July 11, 2022 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov

Archived Funding Opportunity Announcements Related to Ends

Title Announcement # Expiration Date Contact
Interventions to Prevent Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS) Use Among Adolescents RFA-DA-21-009 (R01 Clinical Trial Optional) October 20, 2020 Rachel Grana Mayne, Ph.D., M.P.H.
rachel.mayne@nih.gov

Selected Active NCI Grants focused on ENDS

PI Name Organization Name Project Title Project Number
Dr. Melissa Harrell, Ph.D. University of Texas ENDS Use Trajectories from Adolescence through Young Adulthood: A Longitudinal Study of Risk Factors and Profiles R01CA239097-02
Dr. Steven Kelder, Ph.D., M.P.H. University of Texas Middle School Cluster RCT to Evaluate E-Cigarette Prevention Program: Catch My Breath R01CA242171
Dr. Megan Piper, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin Understanding the Real-World Impact of the Use of Three Alternate Nicotine-Delivery Products on Combustible Cigarette Use R01CA239309-02

Additional Resources

E-cigarette, Or Vaping Product Use- Associated Lung Injury (Evali)

In Fall 2019, CDC, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), state and local health departments, and other clinical and public health partners investigated a multistate outbreak of lung injury associated with e-cigarette, or vaping, product (devices, liquids, refill pods, and/or cartridges) use. CDC, in collaboration with state and local health partners, medical professionals and academic researchers, provided guidance to clinicians, health departments, and the public. Vitamin E acetate, an additive used in THC-containing products obtained from largely informal sources (e.g. family, friends, and in-person or online dealers), has been strongly linked to EVALI. However, evidence is not sufficient to rule out the contribution of other chemicals of concern, including chemicals in either THC or non-THC products, in some of the reported EVALI cases.

Additional information is available from the CDC here:  https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/severe-lung-disease.html

CDC’s General ENDS Information

NHLBI Director’s Message on Vaping

NIDA ENDS Information

Teen.Smokefree.gov: How to Quit Vaping

2020 Smoking Cessation: A Report of the Surgeon General

2016 Surgeon General’s Report: E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults

2019 AACR E-cigarette Congressional Briefing: E-cigarettes and Nicotine Addiction: A Potential Public Health Crisis for Youth and Young Adults (event held June 12, 2019) exit disclaimer

2018 Surgeon General’s Advisory on E-cigarette Use Among Youth

2018 National Academies of Science Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) report, Public Health Consequences of E-Cigarettes exit disclaimer

ASTHO ENDS Resources exit disclaimer

Last Updated
November 02, 2020